What Linux Software Replaces Which Windows Software?

Tux, as originally drawn by Larry Ewing

Image via Wikipedia

Different operating systems use different programs to perform different functions. For example, Windows uses Internet Explorer, Netscape / Mozilla, and other programs to provide users with e-mail service.

If for some reason you or your company switches from Windows operating system to the Linux operating system, your first response may be to run through around screaming, “Where will I find my e-mail?” “Where will my file-sharing programs be?” “How will I find anything?”

Just calm down and take a deep breath, because this article is going to give you the Linux program names for Windows programs on some of the most widely-used ones. This way, when you first tentatively approach your computer after Linux has been implemented, you won’t feel like you’re navigating uncharted waters.

Both Windows and Linux software programs can have different names. Not all the names will be listed here, just some of the more common ones. Remember, too, that your company may have several Linux programs to choose from, and not all of them will appear in this article.

  • E-mail: If you currently use Outlook Express in Windows, your e-mail program may now be Kmail, Gnus, or Althea.
  • Address book: Windows uses the address book feature included in Outlook; in Linux, your address book may be in Rubrica, Flashget, Go!zilla, or another program.
  • Web browser: Internet Explorer, Netscape / Mozilla and others are used on Windows; coincidentally, Netscape / Mozilla is one of the Linux programs that can be used. Perhaps your company will choose to remain with a familiar one. If not, look for Galeon or Konqueror.

 

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